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Western Australia: Caversham Wildlife Park (Day 2)

posted by Martin Rubli at 15:16

Day Two took us to a wildlife park on the outskirts of Perth. A short train and bus ride away (never difficult thanks to TransPerth's great mobile app and the friendly staff), Caversham Wildlife Park is located inside Whiteman Park. Even before we entered the wildlife park we were lucky enough to see our first wild kangaroos – which I promptly mistook for deers until one of them raised its head out of the shadows.

We originally thought a wildlife park wouldn't quite be the typical tourist destination but it turned out that most Australians you see there are part of the staff. Apparently cuddling koalas and taking photos with giant rat-pigs (see below) is on many an Australia traveler's to-do list. While I prefer to give the animals their physical space I did enjoy the opportunity to take my zoo lens for a spin. :-)


The entrance to Whiteman Park, northwest of Perth.

The entrance to Whiteman Park, northwest of Perth.

Four of Australia's famous road signs on a single post! How's that for luck and photographic efficiency?

Four of Australia's famous road signs on a single post! How's that for luck and photographic efficiency?

The small track leading to the village.

The small track leading to the village.

Our first wild kangaroos!

Our first wild kangaroos!

The entrance to Caversham Wildlife Park.

The entrance to Caversham Wildlife Park.

Is it sleeping or whacking its head against the tree?

Is it sleeping or whacking its head against the tree?

The obligatory Koala group photo. :-)

The obligatory Koala group photo. :-)

It moves!

It moves!

A Tasmanian devil. It was hard to take a clear photo of this one because the poor animal just kept running around the cage in the exact same circle over and over again.

A Tasmanian devil. It was hard to take a clear photo of this one because the poor animal just kept running around the cage in the exact same circle over and over again.

Scary? Not so much, this cutie one was only about a meter long.

Scary? Not so much, this cutie one was only about a meter long.

A beautifully colored Gouldian finch.

A beautifully colored Gouldian finch.

If memory serves this is a fairy wren.

If memory serves this is a fairy wren.

(untitled)
Not a pig, not a super sized rat, but the wildlife park's famous wombat.

Not a pig, not a super sized rat, but the wildlife park's famous wombat.

A kookaburra.

A kookaburra.

Besides taking photos with koalas and wombats, feeding the kangaroos is another popular activity at the park.

Besides taking photos with koalas and wombats, feeding the kangaroos is another popular activity at the park.

Does life get any better than that?

Does life get any better than that?

A rainbow lorikeet.

A rainbow lorikeet.

An Australian white ibis mid-flight.

An Australian white ibis mid-flight.


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Western Australia: Caversham Wildlife Park (Day 2)

posted by Martin Rubli at 13:44

Day Two took us to a wildlife park on the outskirts of Perth. A short train and bus ride away (never difficult thanks to TransPerth's great mobile app and the friendly staff), Caversham Wildlife Park is located inside Whiteman Park. Even before we entered the wildlife park we were lucky enough to see our first wild kangaroos – which I promptly mistook for deers until one of them raised its head out of the shadows.

We originally thought a wildlife park wouldn't quite be the typical tourist destination but it turned out that most Australians you see there are part of the staff. Apparently cuddling koalas and taking photos with giant rat-pigs (see below) is on many an Australia traveler's to-do list. While I prefer to give the animals their physical space I did enjoy the opportunity to take my zoo lens for a spin. :-)


The entrance to Whiteman Park, northwest of Perth.

The entrance to Whiteman Park, northwest of Perth.

Four of Australia's famous road signs on a single post! How's that for luck and photographic efficiency?

Four of Australia's famous road signs on a single post! How's that for luck and photographic efficiency?

The small track leading to the village.

The small track leading to the village.

Our first wild kangaroos!

Our first wild kangaroos!

The entrance to Caversham Wildlife Park.

The entrance to Caversham Wildlife Park.

Is it sleeping or whacking its head against the tree?

Is it sleeping or whacking its head against the tree?

The obligatory Koala group photo. :-)

The obligatory Koala group photo. :-)

It moves!

It moves!

A Tasmanian devil. It was hard to take a clear photo of this one because the poor animal just kept running around the cage in the exact same circle over and over again.

A Tasmanian devil. It was hard to take a clear photo of this one because the poor animal just kept running around the cage in the exact same circle over and over again.

Scary? Not so much, this cutie one was only about a meter long.

Scary? Not so much, this cutie one was only about a meter long.

A beautifully colored Gouldian finch.

A beautifully colored Gouldian finch.

If memory serves this is a fairy wren.

If memory serves this is a fairy wren.

(untitled)
Not a pig, not a super sized rat, but the wildlife park's famous wombat.

Not a pig, not a super sized rat, but the wildlife park's famous wombat.

A kookaburra.

A kookaburra.

Besides taking photos with koalas and wombats, feeding the kangaroos is another popular activity at the park.

Besides taking photos with koalas and wombats, feeding the kangaroos is another popular activity at the park.

Does life get any better than that?

Does life get any better than that?

A rainbow lorikeet.

A rainbow lorikeet.

An Australian white ibis mid-flight.

An Australian white ibis mid-flight.


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