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Typhoon Soulik

posted by Martin Rubli at 05:27

This weekend we got hit by the first typhoon of the 2013 season. Unfortunately the timing was once again such that the typhoon vacation fell on a Saturday.

Below are a few photos I took this morning after the worst had passed.


You'd think the security guards would have enough job dedication (or at least common sense) to walk around the building before the typhoon and move loose things to safety, but apparently that's too much to ask for $1400/month/apartment.

You'd think the security guards would have enough job dedication (or at least common sense) to walk around the building before the typhoon and move loose things to safety, but apparently that's too much to ask for $1400/month/apartment.

And that's why the whole swimming pool is littered with paper, buckets, and chairs.

And that's why the whole swimming pool is littered with paper, buckets, and chairs.

The people who (re)stabilized the trees after the last typhoon apparently didn't learn much, so the the trees in front of our house got uprooted again.

The people who (re)stabilized the trees after the last typhoon apparently didn't learn much, so the the trees in front of our house got uprooted again.

If scooters routinely get blown over by the wind then parking your bike outside is a long shot.

If scooters routinely get blown over by the wind then parking your bike outside is a long shot.

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This hairdresser's shop sign came down completely.

This hairdresser's shop sign came down completely.

I'd feel sorry for the owner of this new scooter, but you can estimate his IQ from the fact that he removed the rearview mirrors.

I'd feel sorry for the owner of this new scooter, but you can estimate his IQ from the fact that he removed the rearview mirrors.

This shop's sign also came off and got blown all the way to the other side of the street.

This shop's sign also came off and got blown all the way to the other side of the street.

Typhoon day is always payback day for those riders who inconsiderately park their scooters on the side stand, thereby making it harder for people on their left to get in or out.

Typhoon day is always payback day for those riders who inconsiderately park their scooters on the side stand, thereby making it harder for people on their left to get in or out.

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MythBusters - the Switzerland episode

posted by Martin Rubli at 14:48

Since Taiwan has been firmly in the grip of winter for the last two months I thought it was a good time to do away with a widespread stereotype; Swiss people being resistant to cold.

To make sure we're on the same page I want to mention that when I'm talking about winter in Taiwan that means temperatures that drop as low as 10-15 °C (that's 50-59 F if you're unlucky enough to measure temperature relative to the smelly armpit of a Polish physicist's wife). That may not sound particularly cold but it sure feels cold when the humidity is 80% or higher and live in a windy city.

With a body fat percentage of under 13% which, thank you very much, puts me in the category of "Athletes", you'll naturally see and hear me shiver a lot or complain about the cold. This draws a lot of wonder from my Taiwanese friends and colleagues who think that with Switzerland regularly having sub-zero (again Celsius scale, not armpit icicles) temperatures I should be running around in shorts and a T-shirt instead of hugging my oil heater.

Myth: Swiss people are immune to cold.

Analysis: There are two important factors here:

  1. Humidity. Swiss winter is very dry and hardly windy unless you happen to live in a few particular areas. I don't know how to put the felt temperature at different air humidity in numbers, but it certainly makes a difference. (There's a formula here but, not surprising given their origin, the nice tables don't go very far towards the cold.) Whatever the numbers may say, 0 degrees at 10% humidity just feels less penetrating than 13 degrees at 80%.

  2. Insulation. Unless you've been traveling to Europe and paying attention to that detail you may not be aware that our houses (and jackets for that matter) are massively insulated. Our walls are not just made from thin wall elements (or reinforced cardboard in some other Western countries ...) but from carefully engineered bricks with layers of insulation that minimize heat transfer. Together with double glazed windows and a central heating system that makes for a cozy home and reasonable heating costs.

Verdict: Myth busted!

Luckily winter is short in Taiwan! Last week we've already had temperatures in the mid-20's and my summer clothes are getting ready to come out of hibernation.